PERSONAL DETAILS

ian-scanning-oyster-beds

IAN CAMERON

To study developments in respect to growing, harvesting, processing and sales of blackcurrants - USA, Canada, UK, Germany

Alongside an interest in small fruit production Ian purchased the first emus to come to Tasmania via video-link from West Australia. These required 2.5 metre fencing so why not run deer with emus the shed handling requirements were similar. He was interested in the production of oil and leather from the emus and built this into a viable business and sold it.

FELLOWSHIP DETAILS

1972

My first experience of overseas travel what an eye opener. Opportunities in so many new fields some of which I have pursued. I continued with blackcurrant production and mechanical harvesting with a machine I imported from the UK for 10 years after my return from the fellowship. I was still involved with poultry production at the time and used all the manure from the farms in liquid form on the currants.

FELLOWSHIP CONCLUSIONS & OUTCOMES

My wife and I purchased a motel was at Dunalley, I don’t know why all work and no play! The Motel was at Dunalley. Oyster farming was a new Venture just starting in Tassie so why not. However after 3 years the spat (baby oyster seed) which was collected in the Tamer River failed. No spat no industry. Together with other industry reps and Fisheries research at Taroona we built the first shellfish hatchery in the Southern Hemisphere. I was chairman of the board for the first 5 years. As the industry developed it was important to have a backup hatchery as season failures were not unknown So being fed up with Motels we converted the building which is situated to on the canal at Dunalley to a successful shellfish hatchery. We sold off the units and kept one house as an office and turned the restaurant into the 0yster hatchery.
We also run 4 oyster leases and the company Cameron of Tasmania is totally integrated from spat production, grow out, Seed sales processing to 1/2 shell and marketing.
I am extremely fortunate to have my family and grandkids involved running this operation. Employing 36 people.
I guess all because of a chance to experience something other than my own little world of that time.
I am now retired apart from Board and staff meetings.
I now spend most of my time gardening golfing and salt and fresh water fly fishing.